Rumors suggest that it is coming back to our Pine Tree State with a vengeance too.

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According to the United States Forest Service, as of 2021, Maine is over 80% forested, approximately estimated at 83% of our state. Additionally, the percentage of our state’s forest with water removed from the total area is closer to 90%. With Maine having an estimated 17,518,847 acres of forest land, there are no surprises that we have a pretty ‘wild’ wildlife population.

Credit: Jordan Verge / Townsquare Media
Credit: Jordan Verge / Townsquare Media
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It’s no secret; Maine is well-known for its wildlife.

Our state has one of the biggest moose and black bear populations in the United States. Bears and moose, along with white-tailed deer, are arguably the most sought-after animals for viewing and hunting in Vacationland. The bear and moose population aside, we’re home to several creatures of different shapes and sizes. Most of these are mostly harmless, but we do have a few bad apples in the bunch that can cause more harm than good.

Photo by John Thomas on Unsplash
Photo by John Thomas on Unsplash
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But, what is the most dangerous animal in the world, and why is it coming back to Maine?

We’ve talked about bears and moose already; nope, it’s neither of them. According to the National Park Service, while moose collisions account for approximately 440 deaths a year, and additionally, less than one person is killed by black bears annually, neither are even close to being the most deadly animals on Earth.

Photo by Shivam Kumar on Unsplash
Photo by Shivam Kumar on Unsplash
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Surprisingly, and understandably underwhelmingly, the deadliest animal on earth is the mosquito. Mosquitoes are by far the most dangerous animals in the world, killing on average 725,000 humans each year through spreading diseases such as malaria and West Nile virus. 

Photo by Syed Ali on Unsplash
Photo by Syed Ali on Unsplash
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According to BBC Science,

Malaria infection is particularly bad in Africa, with the region accounting for 95 per cent of cases and 96 per cent of deaths worldwide.

Additionally, BBC Science approximates that mosquitoes kill nearly double the number of people that humans do each year.

Photo by Егор Камелев on Unsplash
Photo by Егор Камелев on Unsplash
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When are they going to be coming back to Maine?

According to Safe Pro Pest,

Mosquitoes require a temperature between 50 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit to survive. That's why they come out in the summer season from March to early November.

Photo by Erik Karits on Unsplash
Photo by Erik Karits on Unsplash
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Since Maine is usually a little late to the spring party,’ mosquitoes may also come a little later, but as we all know, once they’re here, they’re terrible.

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