Planning on doing some yard work over the next few weekends? Well, make sure you're ready for what you might stir up.

Browntail Moths eggs, Facebook, Hauns Bassett

If you happen to live in an area where Browntail Moths were a problem this past Spring or Summer, you're not out of the woods just yet.

The Maine CDC put out a post this week, warning people to take extra care when doing yard work this fall.

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"Mowing, raking, and other outdoor activities can stir up browntail moth hairs."

Seriously?! These things just won't go away!

Some of the precautions the Maine CDC suggests include wearing protective clothing and taking extra care working in spots that may not have seen much rainfall, like under a deck or in well-covered overhangs.

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Instead of raking dry leaves, which could lead to disrupting buried browntail hairs, sending them through the air to wreak havoc, experts say to rake when leaves are wet. It's more of a workout, for sure, because those leaves will be heavy. But it beats a nasty rash and respiratory issues.

Browntail Moths eggs, Facebook, Hauns Bassett

And finally, if you have firewood stored outside, make sure it's not harboring stowaway browntails before you burn it, again, sending their nasty bits through the air.

Honestly, there's just no winning with these things!

It's recommended, on the Maine CDC website, that if you do come across old browntail bodies or nests, that you "soak them in soapy water for 3-5 days and then throw them away."  They also say the best time to spot browntail nests/webs are October through April. If you see them in the branches in your trees, clip those branches now to reduce their population this coming spring.

Please! For the love of...just snip and drown those things, will ya?!

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