Looking for a good paying job with benefits?

Maine's 4th biggest employer, General Dynamics/Bath Iron Works, will be holding a "Drive-Thru Hiring" event this Thursday through Saturday at the Blue Hill Fairgrounds.

At any given time, up to 6000 trade people work both repairing and producing both military and commercial ships at the facility in Bath, Maine.  The types of jobs performed there range from general laborers, to electricians,  machinists, welders, pipefitters, shipfitters, carpenters, and tinsmiths.  Most are high paying jobs with very good benefits, something not all that common in our neck of the woods for blue collar workers.

So, here's the gig.

Representatives from General Dynamics will be interviewing people this Thursday through Saturday, July 8th through 10th, at the Blue Hill Fairgrounds.  Hours are 9 to 5 both Thursday and Friday, and 11 until 3 this Saturday, according to a recent posting to Facebook.

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You won't even have to get out of your truck.

You'll be interviewed on the spot by the company's hiring managers, and you may even be offered a job on the spot as well. Bring your updated resume as it would be helpful, although it is not required. Casual attire is recommended.  If you're a welder, they ask that you wear closed toe shoes.

Bath Iron Works is a little over a 100 miles away from Bangor, and the company has recently been producing the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer, the most technically advanced naval warship on the water.

More information about the variety of careers at Bath Iron Works can be found at biwcareers.com.

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