The battle over the North Atlantic Right Whale continues on, now with a non-profit organization in Georgia urging its residents to boycott Maine lobster.

There are fewer than 400 of the endangered Right whales now left in the waters of the Atlantic ocean, and besides natural causes, the endangered specie is more than likely to die from being struck by a ship or by becoming entangled in fishing gear.

Conservationists are encouraged somewhat this year, as more right whales have given birth off the coast of southern states like Georgia which of course has has increased the population, somewhat.  The newborn whales and their mothers have recently been seen off the coast of Massachusetts. Massachusetts Marine authorities have pinpointed where they are and have asked mariners to adhere to a certain speed to keep them safe.

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The Federal Government will release new rules for lobster fishermen in Maine, Massachusetts, and beyond later this year that pertain to preserving the North Atlantic Right Whale, and there is a rally tomorrow at the State House in Augusta hosted by the Maine Lobsterman's Association.  Watch this lobster fisherman's video to get that group's perspective and what they are up against.

Meanwhile in George, a non-profit group named One Hundred Miles that focuses on protecting the coastline and the North Atlantic Right Whale has created a campaign called "Eat Local, Not Lobster", which asks their supporters to essentially boycott any lobster caught and then shipped from New England and Maine.

As published in the Bangor Daily News, Alice Keyes of One Hundred Miles told various media, "We really wanted to try to engage in an effort that would really make a difference. And so with the entanglement thing, one of the number one reasons for the right whales’ death, we figured why would we support an industry that is causing these animals to die? And why would we purchase these products that are really a luxury?”

The Best Restaurants in Downeast Maine for Lobster

So when your hungry out-of-state relatives or friends come to our great state, where do you take them for a mouth-watering lobster dinner?

The answer to that often asked question will be top of mind for a lot of Mainers this season, as thousands of tourists, relatives, and friends drive hundreds if not thousands of miles to take in the sights and eat what our state is most famous for, lobster.

Whether it's a lobster salad, in a hot dog roll, a broiled tail, thrown into a pot of boiling sea water, or god forbid, made into a lobster poutine, people near and far crave it, and as soon as they make it into this neck of the woods it'll be what they have for dinner that night.

While each of us already have a few favorite snack bars, take-outs, and restaurants in mind, it would be wrong of this author to pass along those personal suggestions. So, we're going to rely on the reviews of TripAdvisor to point our visitors in the right directions. We've focused on the Ellsworth and Mount Desert Island area, and here is what we found as we count our way up to the #1 most recommended place for lobster Downeast.